Chinese Pregnant Women Rushed to Hong Kong through “Unusual Way”

Oriental Daily

2nd May, 2013

<Pregnant Chinese Women Rushed to Hong Kong through “Unusual Way”>

雙非怪招闖關

The problem of Pregnant Chinese women rushing to Hong Kong International Airport is escalating (note: to enter Hong Kong from abroad)! There were two cases of pregnant Chinese women entering Hong Kong through the airport last week, both of them held foreign residents documents to fly to Hong Kong from the Philippines, trying to enter Hong Kong under the guise of being from somewhere other than the mainland. Luckily the officials of Immigration Department saw through their intention and denied their entrance. Both of them claimed that they felt pain in the abdomen and were then admitted to Princess Margaret Hospital, but doctors certified that they are fit for repatriation so Immigration Department repatriated both. These are the first cases of pregnant Chinese women pretending to be of a different nationality and attempting to enter Hong Kong by air, using circuitous route. According to the source, one of the women met the doctor with a local lawyer. The lawyer heckled the doctor asking “are you assuming responsibility if she has an accident on the plane?”, the doctor replied, “go ahead and sue the Hong Kong SAR Government and Hospital Authority!”. The Immigration Department finally repatriated the pregnant women successfully.

A Chinese pregnant women named Wang (note: a transliteration of her Mandarin Chinese surname) has tried to enter Hong Kong through the Airport in March 2013; she entered Hong Kong again after repatriation, and finally got denied for access

A pregnant Chinese woman named Wang (note: a transliteration of her Mandarin Chinese surname) who tried to enter Hong Kong through the airport in March 2013; she entered Hong Kong again after repatriation, and finally was barred access

Accompanied by “family member” instead of husband

Both women were around 36 weeks pregnant. They both arrived in Hong Kong in the middle of last week but no relations were found in either case. They were accompanied by “family members” but not their husbands. One of them presented a travel document issued in Guinea in Africa, but the Immigration Department officials were suspicious and questioned her, then searched her. Her entrance was denied when officials found her Chinese residence document. She immediately claimed that her abdomen was feeling “upset” and was sent to hospital. She was repatriated the next day once the doctor concluded that she was fit for air travel.

The pregnant woman entered Hong Kong by circuitous route. She first held a Chinese resident document to go to Hong Kong from China, then flew to the Philippines with a Guinea document, and finally flew to Hong Kong. It is believed that she thought this could “clear her background” (note: to clear her identity as a China citizen) to enter Hong Kong using the identity of a foreigner so that Immigration Department officials would not be alert to her true identity. But in fact she does not have permanent residency in Guinea.

Problem of Pregnant Chinese women entering Hong Kong by air has been escalating

Problem of Pregnant Chinese women entering Hong Kong by air has been escalating

Two pregnant Chinese women holding foreign residents documents entered Hong Kong from the Philippines. They were denied access by Hong Kong’s Immigration Department

Two pregnant Chinese women holding foreign residents documents entered Hong Kong from the Philippines. They were denied access by Hong Kong’s Immigration Department

“Are you assuming responsibility if she has an accident on the plane?”

Another pregnant Chinese woman also arrived Hong Kong in the middle of last week holding a Philippine resident identity card and Chinese passport. Her entrance to Hong Kong was denied because she is not a permanent resident of the Philippines and because she was around 36 weeks pregnant. She then claimed that her abdomen was upset and was sent to hospital. A doctor concluded that she was fit for repatriation, and was confronted by her accompanying lawyer, “are you assuming responsibility if she has an accident on the plane?”, the doctor replied firmly, “go ahead and sue the Hong Kong SAR Government and Hospital Authority”. The Immigration Department repatriated her after 2 days of her arrival.

An Immigration Department spokesperson refused to comment on individual cases, at the same time saying that Chinese women who are of 28 weeks or more pregnant need to be in possession of a delivery booking in order to enter Hong Kong, or else access will be denied. This year Hong Kong SAR Government has implemented a “zero quota” measure (note: to stop Mainland Chinese women from giving birth in Hong Kong): No public or private hospitals can accept delivery bookings from Chinese women. The Immigration Department further questioned 2,878 pregnant Chinese women in the first quarter of this year: access to Hong Kong was denied for 876 of them. Last year 34,000 pregnant women were questioned, and access denied to 4,200 of them. Double the number denied access the year before.

0502-00174-001b4Screen Shot 2013-05-04 at 3.48.37 AM

How both of the pregnant Chinese women entered Hong Kong: Two Chinese women, around 36 weeks pregnant entered Hong Kong from the Philippines, showing the foreign residents documents to immigration officials at Hong Kong’s airport.

How both of the pregnant Chinese women entered Hong Kong: Two Chinese women, around 36 weeks pregnant entered Hong Kong from the Philippines, showing the foreign residents documents to immigration officials at Hong Kong’s airport.

Officials discovered their Chinese identity and denied them access. They then claimed that their abdomen was feeling upset and were sent to hospital

Officials discovered their Chinese identity and denied them access. They then claimed that their abdomen was feeling upset and were sent to hospital

One of the pregnant women was accompanied by a Hong Kong lawyer. The lawyer asked the doctor when repatriation became imminent, "are you assuming responsibility if she has an accident on the plane?". The doctor replied, "go ahead and sue the HKSAR Government and Hospital Authority!". The immigration department finally deported both back to China by plane.

One of the pregnant women was accompanied by a Hong Kong lawyer. The lawyer asked the doctor when repatriation became imminent, “are you assuming responsibility if she has an accident on the plane?”. The doctor replied, “go ahead and sue the HKSAR Government and Hospital Authority!”. The immigration department finally deported both back to China by plane.

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